Google Search
Search www.israelfaxx.com


Newsletter : 17fx1218.txt

Directory | Previous file | Next file


White House signals Western Wall has to be part of Israel

Ahead of visit by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence to Israel next week, officials note Jerusalem's borders must be resolved through Israeli-Palestinian negotiations - U.S. Middle East peace negotiator Jason Greenblatt to also arrive in Israel next week. News Agencies and Israel Hayom Staff

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence |
Photo: AP

Senior Trump administration officials outlined their view Friday that Jerusalem's Western Wall ultimately will be declared a part of Israel, in another declaration sure to inflame passions among Palestinians and others in the Middle East less than two weeks after U.S. President Donald Trump officially recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

Stressing that the ultimate borders of the holy city must be resolved through Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, the officials – speaking ahead of U.S. Vice President Mike Pence's trip to the region – essentially ruled out, however, any scenario that didn't maintain Israeli control over the Western Wall.

The issue is sensitive because the wall is situated beyond the pre-1967 armistice lines and abuts some of the Islamic world's most revered sites.

"We cannot envision any situation under which the Western Wall would not be part of Israel. But as the president said, the specific boundaries of sovereignty of Israel are going to be part of the final status agreement," a senior administration official said.

Another official later added by email, "We note that we cannot imagine Israel would sign a peace agreement that didn't include the Western Wall."

In a press briefing, another White House official explained that while "the last couple weeks in the region have been a reaction to the Jerusalem decision and we've seen a lot of the emotions," much of the reaction has been positive. "I think that a lot of people in the region, they really respect the president. They really like this administration. We're working well together."

"[Our] number one priority there is countering Iran; defeating ISIS and terror; and then combating the extremist ideology," the official went on to say. "So they know after this that the president will keep his word. He's not going to be doing things like the last administration. They know that he is very serious and focused on his objectives, and we will continue to pursue it."

Nabil Abu Rudeineh, a senior adviser to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, reacted indignantly to the remarks coming out of the U.S. over the weekend. "We will not accept any changes on the borders of east Jerusalem, which was occupied in 1967," he told The Associated Press.

"This statement proves once again that this American administration is outside the peace process," Abu Rudeineh reiterated. "The continuation of this American policy, whether the recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, or moving the American embassy, or such statements, by which the United States decides unilaterally on the issues of the final status negotiations, are a violation of international law and strengthen the Israeli occupation. For us, this is unacceptable. We totally reject it. And we totally denounce it."

Pence plans to visit the Western Wall next week. The administration officials said he would be accompanied by a rabbi to preserve the spiritual nature of his planned visit to the hallowed wall in Jerusalem's Old City. The officials said Pence's Wednesday visit would be conducted in a similar manner to when U.S. President Donald Trump visited in May.

U.S. Special Representative for International Affairs Jason Greenblatt will also head to Israel next week for what will we be his first peace mediation trip to the region since Trump's Jerusalem declaration, a senior administration official said on Friday.

Greenblatt will meet with Fernando Gentilini, the European Union's special representative to the Middle East, and stay for Pence's trip to Israel later in the week, the official said.

Jerusalem's status has been a central issue in the decadeslong Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Trump's announcement last week shook up decades of U.S. foreign policy and countered an international consensus that Jerusalem's status should be decided in negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, who claim east Jerusalem as the capital of their future state.

Pence plans to depart for the Middle East on Tuesday after presiding over the Senate's vote on a sweeping tax overhaul. The vice president will meet Wednesday with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo and then travel to Israel. Pence's two days in Israel will include meetings with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a speech at the Knesset and a visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial.

Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital has sparked protests in the Middle East, and Abbas pulled out of a planned meeting with Pence. Abbas had originally been scheduled to host Pence, a devout Christian, in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem.

Noting the reaction to the Jerusalem decision and "the emotions that have been displayed," the official said Pence's trip is viewed as part of "the ending of that chapter and the beginning of what I would say [is] the next chapter."

Trump officials said Pence would reinforce Trump's announcement on Jerusalem, but the administration also understands the Palestinians may need a cooling-off period.

Israel captured the Old City, home to important Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious sites, along with the rest of east Jerusalem in the 1967 Six-Day War. The U.S. has never recognized Israeli sovereignty over territory occupied in 1967, including east Jerusalem. For this reason, until now, U.S. officials have refused to say explicitly that the wall is part of Israel.

The Western Wall, a retaining wall from the Second Temple, is considered the holiest site where Jews can pray.

Back to home page       |       Newsletters from:





NJ imam who called for murder of Jews to undergo 'retraining'

Imam at New Jersey mosque calls Jews to be killed 'to the very last one,' blames Israel for ISIS attacks. Contact Editor
JTA, 17/12/17 17:37
Share

View from New Jersey
View from New JerseyFlash 90

JTA - The imam of a New Jersey mosque will be sent for "retraining" after delivering anti-Semitic sermons.

Sheikh Aymen Elkasaby, imam of the Islamic Center of Jersey City, in a sermon earlier this month, called Jews "apes and pigs," and urged his followers to: "Count them one by one, and kill them down to the very last one. Do not leave a single one on the face of the Earth." A translated transcript of his sermon was published by the Middle East Media Research Institute, or MEMRI.

He also said of Jews: "They are the most cowardly of nations. They are the weakest of all peoples."

The speech was a rallying cry for the Al-Aqsa Mosque located on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The imam said that the mosque remains "a humiliated prisoner under the oppression of the Jews," and called on Allah to "bring Al-Aqsa back into the fold of Islam and the Muslims."

The president of the Islamic Center of Jersey City, Ahmed Shedeed, told the Algemeiner that Elkasaby will meet with interfaith scholars who will "consult with and retrain him." He compared the retraining to "rehab."

In a sermon on November 24, also transcribed and translated by MEMRI, Elkasaby invoked a conspiracy theory that Israel planned the terrorist attack on the Al-Rawda mosque in Sinai which took place the same day in which more than 300 worshippers were killed.

Shedeed said he was not present in the mosque for either of the speeches.

He noted that the Islamic Center in Jersey City had been located there for forty years. Shedeed also has served as a member of the New Jersey Homeland Security Interfaith Advisory Council.


New Jersey imam who delivered anti-Semitic sermons to receive `retraining' December 17, 2017 9:49am

(JTA) — The imam of a New Jersey mosque will be sent for "retraining" after delivering anti-Semitic sermons.

Sheikh Aymen Elkasaby, imam of the Islamic Center of Jersey City, in a sermon earlier this month, called Jews "apes and pigs," and urged his followers to: "Count them one by one, and kill them down to the very last one. Do not leave a single one on the face of the Earth." A translated transcript of his sermon was published by the Middle East Media Research Institute, or MEMRI.

He also said of Jews: "They are the most cowardly of nations. They are the weakest of all peoples."

The speech was a rallying cry for the Al-Aqsa Mosque located on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The imam said that the mosque remains "a humiliated prisoner under the oppression of the Jews," and called on Allah to "bring Al-Aqsa back into the fold of Islam and the Muslims."

The president of the Islamic Center of Jersey City, Ahmed Shedeed, told the Algemeiner that Elkasaby will meet with interfaith scholars who will "consult with and retrain him." He compared the retraining to "rehab."

In a sermon on November 24, also transcribed and translated by MEMRI, Elkasaby invoked a conspiracy theory that Israel planned the terrorist attack on the Al-Rawda mosque in Sinai which took place the same day in which more than 300 worshippers were killed.

Shedeed said he was not present in the mosque for either of the speeches.

He noted that the Islamic Center in Jersey City had been located there for forty years. Shedeed also has served as a member of the New Jersey Homeland Security Interfaith Advisory Council.


Get JTA's Daily Briefing in your inbox


















Palestinian claims to Jerusalem lose Saudi as well as US support

By DEBKAfile
Dec 16, 2017 @ 15:07 Donald Trump, Gaza, Jared Kushner, Jerusalem, Mahmoud Abbas, Mike Pence, Saudi Prince Salman, West Bank, Western Wall

The Palestinians have three major grievances with the Trump administration on Jerusalem, but are most irked by Saudi backing for the Trump peace plan.

Palestine rage over President Donald Trump Jerusalem decisions was further fueled Friday, Dec. 17 by the comment from Washington: "We cannot envision any situation under which the Western Wall would not be part of Israel. But, as the president said, the specific boundaries of sovereignty of Israel are going to be part of the final status agreement." It came with the announcement that Vice President Mike Pence will pay a visit to the Western Wall next Wednesday' Dec. 20, during his Middle East tour. Not too long ago, President Trump himself visited the Western wall on May 22. But then, American security officers excluded their Israeli counterparts from safeguarding the visit, claiming it took place outside Israeli territory. border. Eight months later, Trump has restored Israel's sovereignty to the Western Wall, which encloses the hallowed compound of the last Jewish Temple, in time for his vice president to pray there. For the Palestinians, this is another Trump-administration shift in Israel's favor and its consequent loss of credibility as an honest broker for the Palestinian-Israeli dispute. The Palestinian Authority in Ramallah reiterated this position Saturday, after announcing a boycott of the Pence visit and severing contact with Washington – a position they can't really afford to sustain for long. But what is really irking them even more than the Trump administration's pro-Israeli stance on Jerusalem is its endorsement by their longstanding champion, Riyadh. The impression gaining ground in recent weeks is that Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner has reached an understanding with Saudi Crown Prince Muhammed bin Salman (MbS) on a new plan for resolving the Israeli-Arab conflict, which departs fundamentally from the traditional core issues that scuttled all past peace processes.

The first inkling of such a plan came on the pages of the The New York Times of Nov. 11, under the title "Trump Team Begins Drafting Middle East Peace Plan." This plan was described as pushing ahead on the fast track due to three factors:

Its support by the Saudi crown prince and Egyptian President Abdel-Fatteh El-Sisi. The uncertainty of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu's future in the face of long-running police probes against him. The constant erosion of Mahmoud Abbas' standing as Palestinian Authority Chairman, whose rapidly diminishing popularity, due to his advanced age of 82 and the corruption rife in Ramallah, is reflected in the latest Palestinian opinion poll on Dec. 7-10. (70 percent want him to retire: 84 percent on the West Bank and 26 percent in the Gaza Strip).

Washington has therefore chosen a moment of leadership weakness to push ahead with its plans to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. A week before the NYT report, Abbas (Abu Mazen) paid an urgent visit to Riyadh to meet Prince Muhammed. Since then, a continuous stream of tidbits is emanating from their conversation. According to one report, the Saudi prince put before the Palestinian leader an American-Saudi blueprint. It proclaims Abu Dis, a village located on the fringes of east Jerusalem, as the capital of the future Palestinian state. That state would have limited sovereignty in parts of the West Bank, while all the Jewish communities would remain in place. East Jerusalem would not be declared its capital; and the Palestinian refugees' "right of return" was dropped, as was mention of the pre-1967 boundaries.

Notwithstanding flat Palestinian denials of all these reports, they continue to gain ground and credence. The picture emerging from the Saudi prince's conversation with Abu Mazen is taking shape as underlining the following points:

The old Saudi-Arab League peace plan of 2003 is a dead letter; Riyadh has dropped its demand that Israel accept a Palestinian State with East Jerusalem as its capital; Since the original Saudi Peace proposal which the prince called Plan A was dead, it is necessary to move forward to Plan B. Plan B is essentially as follows: The State of Palestine would be established in the Gaza Strip plus large tracts of territory to be annexed from northern Sinai. Egypt has agreed to this outline. This deal would essentially render irrelevant the Palestinian demand to restore the pre-1967 boundaries for their state. When Abu Mazen asked what would happen to the West Bank, MbS reportedly replied: "We can continue to negotiate about this." And when he pressed further: What about Jerusalem, the settlements, Areas B and C, the answer was: "These will be issues for negotiation between two states, and we will help you."

These reports are furiously denied by Palestinian officials and, although no other official source, including Prince Muhammad, has verified them, they continue to abound. The Palestinians now have three major grievances against the Trump administration for which they are cutting off ties with Washington in protest: Recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, the promise to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and, now, the declaration of the Western Wall as part of Israel in any political solution. This will be underlined by the Pence visit. Yet neither Washington nor Riyadh shows any sign of backtracking on their far-reaching plan which defies all former conventions.

Abu Mazen is in a jam. Even if he tries to distance himself from Washington, he cannot possibly divorce the Palestinians from the two leading Arab nations, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, which would lop off the branches of the Arab tree on which they sit. Doing so might well thrust Ramallah on the path of the anti-West Turkish-Iranian-Hizballah axis and its extremist ideology. There are early signs that his rivals in Gaza, the radical Hamas, may be adopting this path. After Friday prayers in the mosques of Gaza, on Dec. 15, some of the demonstrators at the Israel border force were seen for the first time holding aloft huge placards with depictions of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, Commander of Iranian Revolutionary Guards Al Qods. If Iran can gain solid inroads into the Palestinian community at large, its dispute with Israel would assume an entirely new dimension.


Turkey vows to open 'Palestinian embassy' in Jerusalem

Turkish president pledges to open embassy to 'Palestine ' in Israel's capital. 'We've already declared it Palestinian capital.' Contact Editor
David Rosenberg, 17/12/17 16:13
Share

Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Recep Tayyip ErdoganThinkstock

Turkey's president vowed Sunday that his country would open an embassy in eastern Jerusalem, after a coalition of Islamic states recognized portions of the Israeli capital city as the capital of a Palestinian state.

Last Wednesday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan chaired an emergency meeting of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in response to President Donald Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital a week earlier. The president also ordered the State Department to begin work on relocating the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Following Erdogan's lead, the OIC declared portions of Jerusalem to be the capital of a future Palestinian state at last week's meeting.

On Sunday, Erdogan issued an additional statement on Jerusalem, adding that Turkey intends to open an embassy to a Palestinian state in Jerusalem, despite the city being a sovereign part of Israel.

"We have already declared East Jerusalem as the capital of the Palestinian state but we haven't been able to open our embassy there because Jerusalem is currently under occupation," Erdogan said at a meeting of the Justice and Development Party, Hurriyet reported. "God willing we will open our embassy there."

Last year, Turkey signed onto a reconciliation agreement with Israel, after having severed ties with the Jewish state in 2010, when Israeli soldiers boarded a Turkish blockade-runner attempting to bypass Israel's security blockade on the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip. When pro-Hamas Turkish citizens onboard the ship assaulted the soldiers, IDF forces responded by opening fire, killing 10.

The Turkish government threated to again cut ties with Israel earlier this month after President Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital.



Tags:
Jerusalem, Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Donald Trump


Share
Related Stories

Condition of Border Policeman



A liberal group celebrated Hanukkah in Trump Tower — to protest Trump

By Ben SalesDecember 15, 2017 12:34pm
90shares

Rabbi Debra Cantor of Congregation B'nai Tikvoh-Sholom in Bloomfield, Conn., speaking at Trump Tower in Manhattan at the "Not The White House Chanukah Party," a protest organized by T'ruah, Dec. 13, 2017. (Jake Ratner)

(JTA) — It would be reasonable to assume that the Jews lighting a Hanukkah menorah on the fifth floor of Trump Tower supported the president.

The front of the Midtown Manhattan high-rise, after all, bears his name in large gold letters, and the trash cans in its lobby are emblazoned with "Make America Great Again." More than a year after the election, campaign gear is sold in the basement.

But the several dozen Jews who came together in the building Wednesday evening weren't there to celebrate its namesake but to protest him.

Organized by T'ruah, the liberal rabbis' human rights group, the protest was titled "Not the White House Chanukah Party."

The president hosted his own Hanukkah party on Dec. 7, with a guest list notable for its omission of Democratic lawmakers and Jewish leaders who have objected to much of his domestic agenda. Some of them came to Wednesday's protest instead.

T'ruah was able to use the building because a terrace on its fifth floor is technically a New York City public park open to anyone. All one needs to do is pass through security and go to the elevator, where a uniformed attendant will press the button for you.

The event itself was a relatively standard protest of Trump — with a Jewish holiday twist. There were songs ("Al Hanisim," a Hanukkah prayer thanking God for miracles), chants ("More light, more justice!"), protest signs and snacks (fair trade Hanukkah gelt and decaf coffee). Nine leaders of liberal Jewish groups — including the Workmen's Circle, HIAS, Jews For Racial & Economic Justice and Bend the Arc — spoke, then each held up a picture of a candle and lined up to form a human menorah.

"Tonight, I light this candle to banish the darkness that comes when power turns abusive, when sexual harassment and sexual violence put fear into our hearts and silence us," said Dina Charnin, director of Israel policy and programs at the National Council of Jewish Women.

A handful of counterprotesters showed up on the terrace led by Karen Lichtbraun, head of the New York chapter of the far-right Jewish Defense League. She was wearing a camouflage Make America Great Again hat and called T'ruah anti-Semitic.

"T'ruah came here to bash the president and to bash Israel," Lichtbraun told JTA. "We're here to express ourselves. We stand with Israel. We stand with the president."

T'ruah, for its part, sees itself as articulating Jewish values in Israel and the United States. And while it didn't stand with the president, exactly, it did stand in his building — at least for one night. Get JTA's Daily Briefing in your inbox




Egypt Reopens Ancient Library at St. Catherine Monastery December 17, 2017 4:12 AM

Associated Press

A view of Saint Catherine monastery in South Sinai, Egypt, Dec. 16, 2017, where an inauguration ceremony was held for the opening of the ancient library.
A view of Saint Catherine monastery in South Sinai, Egypt, Dec. 16, 2017, where an inauguration ceremony was held for the opening of the ancient library.
Share

ST. CATHERINE'S, EGYPT —

Egypt reopened on Saturday an ancient library that holds thousands of centuries-old religious and historical manuscripts at the famed St. Catherine Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in South Sinai.

The inauguration ceremony, attended by Egyptian and Western officials, comes after three years of restoration work on the eastern side of the library that houses the world's second largest collection of early codices and manuscripts, outnumbered only by the Vatican Library, according to Monk Damyanos, the monastery's archbishop.

"The library is now open to the public and scholars," said Tony Kazamias, an adviser to the archbishop, adding that restoration work is still underway without specifying a completion date. Officials walk around the main hall of the newly opened Saint Catherine library in South Sinai, Egypt, Dec. 16, 2017. The inauguration ceremony comes after three years of restoration work on the work on the eastern side of the library that houses the world's second largest collection of early codices and manuscripts, outnumbered only by the Vatican Library. Officials walk around the main hall of the newly opened Saint Catherine library in South Sinai, Egypt, Dec. 16, 2017. The inauguration ceremony comes after three years of restoration work on the work on the eastern side of the library that houses the world's second largest collection of early codices and manuscripts, outnumbered only by the Vatican Library.

?Thousands of manuscripts, scrolls, books

The ancient library holds around 3,300 manuscripts of mainly Christian texts in Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Georgian and Slavonic, among other languages. It also contains thousands of books and scrolls dating to the 4th century.

At least 160 of the manuscripts include faint scratches and ink tints beneath more recent writing, according to Kazamias, who believes the palimpsests were likely scraped out by the monastery's monks and reused sometime between the 8th and 12th centuries.

During the library's renovation, archaeologists apparently found some of Hippocrates' centuries-old medical recipes. The ancient Greek physician is widely regarded as the "father of western medicine."

"The most valuable manuscript in the library is the Codex Sinaiticus, (which) dates back to the fourth century," said the Rev. Justin, an American monk working as the monastery's librarian. "This is the most precious manuscript in the world," referring to the ancient, handwritten copy of the New Testament.

The library also held some ancient paintings that are on display in the monastery's museum.

"There are beautiful paintings in the manuscripts. When you turn the (pages) there is a flash of gold and colors. It is a living work of art," Justin said.

A view of the mosaic of transfiguration, which covers the surface of 46 meters square inside the basilica of the monastery of Saint Catherine, is shown, Dec 16, 2017, in South Sinai, Egypt.
A view of the mosaic of transfiguration, which covers the surface of 46 meters square inside the basilica of the monastery of Saint Catherine, is shown, Dec 16, 2017, in South Sinai, Egypt.

?Mosaic of the Transfiguration

The officials also inaugurated the Mosaic of the Transfiguration situated in the eastern apse of the monastery's great basilica. It mosaic covers 46 square meters and features a rich chromatic range of glass paste, glass, stone, gold and silver tesserae. Jesus Christ is depicted in its center between the prophets Elias and Moses. The sixth century mosaic was created at the behest of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian, who also requested building the monastery.

St. Catherine's, where the monastery is located, is an area revered by followers of the Abrahamic faiths, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Like the Old City of Jerusalem, it has become a popular destination and an attraction not only for pilgrims but also tourists from the world over.

The sixth century monastery, one of the oldest Christian Orthodox ones, is home to a small number of monks who observe prayers and daily rituals unchanged for centuries. Its well-preserved walls and buildings are of great significance to the studies Byzantine architecture. It's situated at the foot of Mount Sinai, also known as Jebel Musa or Mount Horeb, where Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments.













The Jerusalem Post - Israel News

December 17 2017 |
Kislev, 29, 5778 |

Arab Israeli Conflict Israel News Opinion Middle East Diaspora Green Israel Premium Christian News JERUSALEM JPOST TECH Israeli Politics OMG Health & Science Judaica Store BDS THREAT EDITION FRANÇAISE Blogs CRYPTO CURRENCY

Jerusalem Post International

Coco Chanel used Nazi laws against Jewish partners, said film

>

`Wonder Woman' gets SAG nod for stunt ensemble >
Seinfeld: My comedy career started on Kibbutz Sa'ar

By Amy Spiro
December 17, 2017 17:15
'The No. 5 War' is slated to screen at the Jerusalem Jewish Film Festival tonight 2 minute read.



Coco Chanel in 1920

Coco Chanel in 1920. (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

It has been almost 50 years since the death of famed French fashion designer Coco Chanel, and the legacy of the chic Parisian has begun to really stink. A new film which appeared on French TV earlier this year alleges that the woman behind one of the most famous fragrances of all time collaborated with the Nazis during World War II against her own Jewish partners.

The new French documentary, The No. 5 War - a reference to the famed scent Chanel No. 5 - claims that Chanel worked with Nazi occupiers of France and used their anti-Jewish laws to get rid of her Jewish associates, brothers Pierre and Paul Wertheimer.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The film will be playing at the Jerusalem Jewish Film Festival this week, and director Stéphane Benhamou is slated to attend one of the screenings.

A trailer for the hour-long film called Chanel "the most celebrated woman of the day - who would stop at nothing to achieve her ends." According to the film's producers, in 1940, Chanel, "with the help of the Nazis occupying France, went to great lengths to get rid of her Jewish associates, the Wertheimer brothers." The battle between them for control of the famed perfume "involved the Parisian who's who, Nazi spies, those in charge of aryanizing the French economy, unscrupulous businessmen, double agents and brilliant perfume designers." Chanel's virulent antisemitic sentiments and dealings with Nazis have been the subject of several books and films already.

In 2014, a French documentary titled L'Ombre d'un Doute (The Shadow of a Doubt), claimed that she had an affair with a senior Nazi official, Baron Hans Gunther von Dincklage. According to the documentary, created by historian Franck Ferrand, Chanel spied for the Nazis and even had her own code name given to her by the Nazi intelligence agency.

In 2011, Hal Vaughan published Sleeping With The Enemy, an explosive account of Chanel's antisemitic views and work with Adolf Hitler. In the book he wrote how a judge in post-war France "had discovered that Chanel had cooperated with German military intelligence and had been teamed with a French traitor, Baron Louis de Vaufreland." But Vaughan learned far more than that judge ever did, including that "while French Resistance fighters were shooting Germans in the summer of 1941, Chanel was recruited as an agent by the Abwehr... Chanel and Baron von Dincklage traveled to bombed-out Berlin in 1943 to offer Chanel's services as an agent to SS Reichsfuhrer Heinrich Himmler."


Home Search

(All material on these web pages is © 2001-2012
by Electronic World Communications, Inc.)



 
Home
Search
 
Read today's issue
 
Who is Don Canaan?
 
IsraelNewsFaxx's Zionism and the Middle East Resource Directory