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Russian-Syrian airborne radar covers all of Israel

DEBKAfile Special Report August 30, 2017, 10:45 AM (IDT)
Tags:  Beriev A-50,  Awacs,  Khmeimim,  Russian buildup in Syria,  US forces in Syria,  Israel,
Advanced A-50 Russian AWACS in Syria
Advanced A-50 Russian AWACS in Syria


The Russian air force has recently deployed to Syria four of its most highly advanced early warning and control aircraft, the Beriev A-50 SRDLO ("Mainstay"), which is rated the most sophisticated AWACS in operation. Several A-50s were spotted flying over Syria in recent months, but they all turned around and headed back to Russia. Four are now installed in the hangars of the Russian Khmeimim Air Base in Syria's Latakia province.

The plane's Shmei-M radar is capable of pinpointing targets across a distance of 600km. While in flight, it covers all parts of Israel and can detect every aerial and military movement.

Moscow has deployed the A-50 in support of the unification of Russian and Syria air defense systems going forward in recent weeks. Henceforth, both their air defense systems will be controlled from a single command center at the Khmeimim air base, with the B-50 living up to its name as operational mainstay.

The Russian and Syrian air defenses will no longer need to swap information in the event of a US or Israeli air or missile attack over Syria before coordinating their operations. All incoming information will be channeled to the Russian joint command, which will determine how to respond and manage any combat which may result.

This development limits the freedom enjoyed hitherto by the US and Israeli air and naval forces over Syria and in the eastern Mediterranean and makes their operations far more hazardous.

The Russian air defense commander in Syria now has at his fingertips a wide range of tools for several synchronized maneuvers. He can, for instance, issue a direct order to simultaneously launch three sophisticated weapons systems with deadly effect, such as the Pantsir-S1 tactical, mobile surface-to-air missiles posted outside Damascus, also called the SA-22 Greyhound; the S-400s, installed on the Dhahaer ram Ahmed hilltop northwest of Latakia; and the anti-ship P-800 Oniks-Yakhont cruise missiles which guard Syria's coast.

These days, America would find it hard to repeat the Tomahawk cruise missile attack President Donald Trump ordered on April 4 in reprisal for the Syrian army's used of poison chemicals against civilians. That massive assault knocked out Syria's Sharyat air base and a large part of its air force.

Israel will likewise not have an easy ride for another air strike like the one conducted on May 17 against an Iranian arms shipment for Hizballah near Damascus. Then, Syria tried for the first time to down the Israeli bomber-fighters with anti-air fire. It failed, but only because Israel was forced to send an Arrow missile into its first operation to prevent Syrian missiles from hitting the returning warplanes over Israeli territory. In future, Israel will have to adjust its tactics to the powerfully enhanced Russian-Syrian defenses.

The newly arrived A-50 also enables the Russian command in Syria to keep a controlling eye on the de-escalations zones gong up in Syria, including the one taking shape on Syria's southwestern border opposite the Israeli Golan.



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Elul 9, 5777, 8/31/2017
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1:42 AM Woman seriously injured in crash in western Galilee1:15 AM French judge orders schools to reinstate pork-free lunches 12:43 AM Harvey expected to weaken within 12 hours12:12 AM Lavrov warns against military actions in Korea 11:46 PM Greenblatt: Iron Dome an example of U.S. support for Israel11:21 PM Victory for Israel in the Security Council 10:57 PM On the table: 3,000 units across Judea and Samaria 10:56 PM 'We'll build a beautiful synagogue in Gaza' 10:56 PM Famed Israeli magician amazes once again 10:26 PM Uri Geller buys Yitzchak Rabin's pair of binoculars 10:15 PM Israeli Consul General: "Jewish community in Houston just trying to recover"

MainAll NewsUS & CanadaCIA admits to conducting psychic experiments on Uri Geller

CIA admits to conducting psychic experiments on Uri Geller

CIA report concludes Geller possessed real paranormal powers. Contact Editor
Gary Willig, 18/01/17 18:55
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The CIA conducted psychic experiments on famed Israeli magician Uri Geller in the 1970s in an attempt to weaponize psychic abilities, newly declassified documents reveal.

About 13 million pages of documents and videos were released Wednesday.

Geller was brought to the Stanford Research Institute in 1972 as part of the "Stargate program," where he was placed in a sealed and monitored room, where his alleged psychic abilities were tested.

In one experiment, a word was chosen at random from a dictionary. It was then drawn and taped to the wall outside Geller's room, where he could not see it.

The word chosen was "fuse." A firecracker was drawn on the paper which was taped to the wall. When the picture was on the wall Geller was asked via intercom what the subject of the picture was.

According to the CIA documents: "His almost immediate response was that he saw a 'cylinder with noise coming out of it.'"

"His drawing to correspond with it was a drum, along with a number of cylindrical-looking objects."

The second word was "bunch," for which a bunch of grapes were drawn.

The CIA report reads: "Geller's immediate response was that he saw 'drops of water coming out of the picture'.

"He then talked about 'purple circles'.

"Finally, he said that he was quite sure that he had the picture. His drawing was indeed a bunch of grapes."

"Both the target picture and Geller's rendition had 24 grapes in the bunch."

Although he did fail to draw anything remotely similar to the drawings on the wall a number of times, the times he succeeded led the report to conclude: "As a result of Geller's success in this experimental period, we consider that he has demonstrated his paranormal perception ability in a convincing and unambiguous manner."

The released documents also dealt with the regime of Nazi Germany, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and UFO sightings.




Elul 9, 5777, 8/31/2017
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News Briefs

1:42 AM Woman seriously injured in crash in western Galilee1:15 AM French judge orders schools to reinstate pork-free lunches 12:43 AM Harvey expected to weaken within 12 hours12:12 AM Lavrov warns against military actions in Korea 11:46 PM Greenblatt: Iron Dome an example of U.S. support for Israel11:21 PM Victory for Israel in the Security Council 10:57 PM On the table: 3,000 units across Judea and Samaria 10:56 PM 'We'll build a beautiful synagogue in Gaza' 10:56 PM Famed Israeli magician amazes once again 10:26 PM Uri Geller buys Yitzchak Rabin's pair of binoculars 10:15 PM Israeli Consul General: "Jewish community in Houston just trying to recover"

MainAll NewsInside IsraelFamed Israeli magician amazes once again

Famed Israeli magician amazes once again

Uri Geller buys Yitzhak Rabin's binoculars at auction house for opening price - ten times less than estimated value. Contact Editor
Arutz Sheva Staff, 30/08/17 22:56
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Uri Geller with the binoculars
Uri Geller with the binocularsJerusalem of Gold auction house

Yesterday an auction was held at the Jerusalem of Gold auction house, where interesting items were sold for thousands of dollars. But then famed Israeli psychic Uri Geller, known for acts including bending spoons and describing hidden drawings, entered, seeking to buy the binoculars of the former Chief of Staff in the Six Day War, Yitzhak Rabin.

According to the auction house, "Uri Geller amazed us when he succeeded in buying the personal binoculars of Yitzhak Rabin. Uri Geller served under him as a soldier in the Six-Day War, and in fact bought the binoculars a few kilometers from where he was wounded on French Hill back in those days."

They added, "The reason Uri surprised us all was mainly because of the final price at which the binoculars were purchased, an event that was particularly dramatic because the binoculars were sold at the opening price, even though they are valued at 10 times more than that, and despite the great interest in the item. When it comes to unique items like these binoculars, there are many buyers competing to purchase them, and their price quickly jumps to the right price for such special objects. "

"Uri Geller is happy to buy Yitzhak Rabin's personal binoculars and plans to present them in the Uri Geller Museum soon to be built in Old Jaffa. "










Israeli Team Sent to Texas to Provide Emergency Hurricane Relief




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Aug 30, 2017

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IsraAID
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Israeli rescue experts are heading to hurricane-ravaged Texas to do what they do best: rush to the scene of a natural disaster and dig in to help those hit hardest by the storm.

IsraAID, an Israeli international humanitarian organization, said on Tuesday it was sending a team of experts from Israel and the U.S. to assist Texas residents dealing with the after effects of Tropical Storm Harvey.

IsraAID, which is coordinating with local Jewish communities, local government in Texas and the Israeli Consul General, plans to deploy 5-7 experts to provide two-stage response to the disaster, with the first stage focusing on removing debris and cleaning homes, then offering psychosocial trauma support to residents.

"In crises with large-scale destruction, national and international aid efforts typically focus on practical, physical support, with limited resources allocated to the mental and emotional rehabilitation of affected populations," said Yotam Polizer, co-CEO of IsraAID.

"For the most vulnerable groups, notably children and the elderly, time is of critical importance; the longer these groups are forced to remain in shelters, the higher the chance of long-term mental health problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), a disorder that can have a debilitating and long-term impact."



Meanwhile, the American Jewish Committee announced a $34,000 grant of aid to the victims of flooding in Texas. This grant will be provided to the American Red Cross, IsraAID and the Jewish Family Service of Houston.

By: JNS

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Family continues printing Houston Jewish paper despite hurricane

99 year old Houston Jewish Herald-Voice continues streak of never missing a single issue through hurricane and floods. Contact Editor
JTA, 30/08/17 22:10
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Hurricane Harvey buries Texas house
Hurricane Harvey buries Texas houseReuters

As Hurricane Harvey bore down on Houston Friday, Vicki Samuels Levy dashed over to the offices of the Houston Jewish Herald-Voice, took the proofs of this week's newspaper and went to her mother's house.

Then mother and daughter spent all night editing the paper. And as the waters rose and they had to be evacuated to a neighbor's house the next day, the proofs were in hand, ready for the printer.

"We want to help each other as family members, then we have to stop and do things for the paper," said Samuels Levy, the paper's CEO. "I couldn't leave to go to my mother's home before I checked all these pages."

The mother, Jeanne Samuels, is also the owner and editor of the Jewish Herald-Voice. Samuels Levy's husband, Lawrence Levy, runs its circulation, and her son, Michael Duke, is its associate editor and news reporter. Her nephew Matt Samuels writes sports and helps with production.

And this week, despite the storm waters deluging the city, the family is determined to keep the paper publishing. Founded in 1908, it has never skipped an issue.

"We've been through this before, and we had a contingency plan in place," Duke said. "We haven't missed a print issue for 109 years. We're hoping this isn't the first time."

Although the work is mostly computer based, the flooding has made it an arduous task to put together the paper. Samuels Levy and her mother were forced to move, along with more than a dozen others, into a neighbor's house Saturday when flood waters got too high. When Levy discovered a computer glitch, he had to wait three days to get to the office and address it.

Duke abandoned his SUV after driving two strangers to a relative's house; the vehicle died on the trip home. He and his wife had to wade a half-mile through waist-high waters to make it back, after which Duke began working again. He has managed to report everything remotely, posting on the paper's website a series of articles on everything from families' homes being flooded for the third time to a Mormon with an air boat rescuing 100 people in a Jewish neighborhood. By Wednesday morning, the website included more than 20 stories on the storm's impact.

In the midst of it all, Duke saved his wife's car from being crushed by a tree, moving it 10 feet just in time. Like friends of theirs, the couple plans to host less fortunate families in their (mostly) dry house as soon as the waters recede enough to allow travel.

"The hard part was on Sunday and Monday, when I was on the phone with people I know and love who were climbing onto kitchen counters and going on the roof waiting for rescue boats to come," Duke said.

As of Wednesday morning, the family was putting the finishing touches on this week's issue. The printer said it hopes to be back up and running on Thursday evening, and the newspaper was awaiting word from the service that labels and mails the copies on Fridaymornings. The Jewish Herald-Voice will offer a free e-edition.

Duke has spent the week worrying about his family. But now that everyone is safe, he said, at least they can worry about the paper together.

"It's been hard because for the first time, we've had family members directly impacted by the flood," he said. "It draws your attention in different directions, but because we're family and we're all connected, we can lean on each other a little more."






Revolutionary Israeli heart failure treatment may save millions of lives August 29, 2017


Revolutionary Israeli heart failure treatment may save millions of livesCORolla congestive heart failure device. (CorAssist)



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A patented Israeli treatment for congestive heart failure shows promise in saving countless lives each year.

It appears that Israeli medical experts may have solved yet another persistent health problem with the introduction of a brand new patented device that may change the way doctors treat congestive heart failure. This condition can be disastrous for the millions of patients worldwide who suffer from it, many of whom ultimately die as their hearts fail to pump adequate supplies of blood.

According to a recent report by the Jerusalem Post, Israeli cardiologist Dr. Yair Peled's patented therapeutic device is poised to change the way congestive heart failure is treated, offering hope to patients who are sometimes given only months to live after diagnosis. Peled's device is essentially a spring that can be inserted into the heart via minimally invasive surgery, which thereafter helps the heart to contract and expand in a more effective way.

At Haifa's Rambam Medical Center, the device was recently implanted for the first time. The 72-year-old patient who underwent the surgery is hopeful that new therapy will extend his life and ameliorate symptoms associated with congestive heart failure.



Dr. Peled leads an Israeli start-up called CorAssist and developed with his co-founder, Dr. Yotam Reisner, the "CORolla device" which remains in human clinical trials. The actual surgery in Haifa was carried out by director of Rambam's cardiac surgery department, Prof. Gil Bolotin, with the assistance of senior physician Dr. Arthur Kerner and other professionals. The team and this surgery received special approval from the Israeli government.

By: World Israel News Staff



heart failureIsraeli medical innovationIsraeli start-up




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Israeli police break up Hasidic wedding over 14-year-old bride August 30, 2017 6:56am
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(Wikimedia Commons)

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Police broke up a wedding in Israel because the bride was 14 years old.

The groom, reported to be in his 20s, and the girl's father were arrested Monday night prior to the ceremony in the central Israeli city of Lod, Israel's Channel 2 first reported. The men later were released to house arrest with restrictive conditions.

The father of the bride, from the Breslov Hasidic sect, is also the rabbi of the community and was slated to perform the ceremony, according to the Channel 2 report.

Allowing an underage child to marry is a serious criminal offense in Israel.

Police were informed of the wedding by city welfare officials, who told the news channel that it would be difficult to ensure that a secret religious wedding ceremony is not held in the coming days or weeks. Featured Stories

    Not even Harvey could stop this family from publishing Houston's Jewish paper
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olling Dice for Coexistence: Jerusalem Backgammon Tourney Brings Arabs, Jews Together August 29, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email Tuesday, 29 August 2017 | A Jerusalem backgammon tournament that brought hundreds of Jews and Arabs together was hailed by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as "a beautiful symbol of coexistence." David Horovitz, founder editor of The Times of Israel, described what happened leading up to Thursday's finale for 25,000 NIS (nearly $7,000) in prize money. "For much of the past year, at a range of venues across this strained mosaic of a city, about 500 Jews, Christians, Muslims and who knows who else have been playing in qualifying tournaments—in the garages of Talpiot, in the YMCA, all over the Old City, in Jewish and Arab neighborhoods—bidding to secure a place in Thursday night's final event." The tournament was the idea of a group called Double Yerushalmi, which is working to develop closer ties between Jerusalem's Jews and Arabs through cultural events. Funding for the tournament was provided by the Jerusalem Foundation, the government's Jerusalem Development Authority, City Hall, and others. On Thursday there were 32 finalists including Jerusalem Arabs, and a garage owner from Ramle. There were also two former champions, a Russian-born Israeli-raised player called "Felafel" who was once the top-ranked backgammon player in the world, and the other was Masayuki "Mochy" Mochizuki, the 2009 World Backgammon Champion. Horovitz described the crowd rooting on the contenders: "The 32 finalists were an overwhelmingly male, Sephardi and Arab bunch. The crowds were more diverse—lots of spouses and kids, shouting in Arabic and Hebrew for their loved ones or for the underdogs, and hundreds of fans and curious onlookers. Adi Suchovolsky, the only woman to make the later stages, was cheered all the way to quarter-final victory. And there were near universal groans when she was defeated by Gadi Carmeli in the semi-finals." While the qualifying rounds were decided by the results of best-of-three play, after three hours, the championship between Gadi Carmeli and Itzik Yakobovitch was determined by a single game. Though the two finalists had discussed splitting the prize, the organizers insisted that the prize would go only to the winner. Carmeli eked out a narrow win to take the prize and the title. "I love the motive behind this event," Mochi, the Japanese champion commented. "It's using backgammon to bring people together, which is wonderful. It's very good for backgammon. And I get to see all my friends in Tel Aviv"—some of whom, he observed, he had met when he previously visited Israel. Zaki Djemel, one of the organizers of Double Yerushalmi, explained earlier this year that the goal of the tournament was "to create some crossover between neighborhoods" that don't normally interact. Djemal also expressed hope that the Jerusalem tournament could lead to a regional Mediterranean tournament later this year and include participants from Europe, Morocco, Turkey, Egypt, and Jordan. Posted on August 29, 2017 Source: (This article was originally published by The Israel Project, in its publication The Tower on 25 August 2017. Time related language has been modified to reflect our republication today. See the original article at this link.) Photo Credit: Pixabay
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